There are so many resources out there on LGBTQIA history! The following list includes personalized accounts, very general introductions, a snapshot of the worldwide struggle, and an insider glimpse into recent legislation. There’s even a graphic novel in there that’s an excellent place to start.

Gay Power: the Stonewall Riots and the Gay Rights Movement

https://catalog.santafelibrary.org/GroupedWork/d514e537-bf5c-c8ee-9242-2cb35fff6da6/Home?searchId=135541&recordIndex=9&page=1&searchSource=local

The Stonewall riots were a series of spontaneous, violent demonstrations against a police raid that took place in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, at the Stonewall Inn, in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City. They are frequently cited as the first instance in American history when people in the homosexual community fought back against a government-sponsored system that persecuted sexual minorities, and they have become the defining event that marked the start of the modern gay rights movement in the United States and around the world.

Homosexuality Around the World: Safe Havens, Cultural Challenges

https://catalog.santafelibrary.org/Record/.b13667282?searchId=135561&recordIndex=2&page=1

In America, most states don’t allow gay marriage—but same-sex marriage has been legal in the Netherlands since 2001. Homophobia is rampant in Jamaica—while gay people serve openly in the Canadian military. Homosexuality could be punishable by death in Uganda—and yet Spain allows gay couples to adopt children. Explore different countries and learn about their cultural attitudes toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people, as gay men and women from around the globe share their personal stories and experiences. Find out how American policies compare with our North American neighbors, Canada and Mexico, and discover how gay equal rights are beginning to emerge in places such as India and South Africa.

Love Wins: the Lovers and Lawyers who Fought the Landmark Case for Marriage Equality

https://catalog.santafelibrary.org/Record/.b1472313x?searchId=135556&recordIndex=4&page=1

The fascinating and very moving story of the lovers, lawyers, judges and activists behind the groundbreaking Supreme Court case that led to one of the most important, national civil rights victories in decades—the legalization of same-sex marriage.

In June 2015, the Supreme Court made same-sex marriage the law in all fifty states in a decision as groundbreaking as Roe v Wade and Brown v Board of Education. Through insider accounts and access to key players, this definitive account reveals the dramatic and previously unreported events behind Obergefell v Hodges and the lives at its center. This is a story of law and love—and a promise made to a dying man who wanted to know how he would be remembered.

Queer: A Graphic History

https://catalog.santafelibrary.org/Record/.b14809448?searchId=135536&recordIndex=3&page=1

Activist-academic Meg John Barker and cartoonist Julia Scheele illuminate the histories of queer thought and LGBTQ+ action in this groundbreaking non-fiction graphic novel. A kaleidoscope of characters from the diverse worlds of pop-culture, film, activism and academia guide us on a journey through the ideas, people and events that have shaped ‘queer theory’.

From identity politics and gender roles to privilege and exclusion, Queer explores how we came to view sex, gender and sexuality in the ways that we do; how these ideas get tangled up with our culture and our understanding of biology, psychology and sexology; and how these views have been disputed and challenged.

When we Rise

https://catalog.santafelibrary.org/Record/.b14809631?searchId=135534&recordIndex=1&page=1

Born in 1954, Cleve Jones was among the last generation of gay Americans who grew up wondering if there were others out there like himself. There were. Like thousands of other young people, Jones, nearly penniless, was drawn in the early 1970s to San Francisco, a city electrified by progressive politics and sexual freedom.

Jones found community–in the hotel rooms and ramshackle apartments shared by other young adventurers, in the city’s bathhouses and gay bars like The Stud, and in the burgeoning gay district, the Castro, where a New York transplant named Harvey Milk set up a camera shop, began shouting through his bullhorn, and soon became the nation’s most outspoken gay elected official. With Milk’s encouragement, Jones dove into politics and found his calling in “the movement.” When Milk was killed by an assassin’s bullet in 1978, Jones took up his mentor’s progressive mantle–only to see the arrival of AIDS transform his life once again.

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